TSA members make strong contest showings

Tennessee Screenwriting Association members have placed in several contests this summer. Check out these awesome success stories:

JEFFREY CHASE‘s feature script, “The Penetration Expert,” advanced to the quarterfinals round of the Nashville Film Fest in the Genre Feature category.

PAULA PHELPS WEAVER‘s feature script “The Lion in Winter County” advanced to the quarterfinals round of the Nashville Film Fest in the Tennessee Writers category.

G ROBERT FRAZIER‘s comedy pilot, “Bill Fisher’s Trading Post,”  advanced to the semifinals round of the 2020 Nashville Film Fest in the Tennessee Writers category.

JAY WRIGHT‘s short horror script, “The Siren,” advanced to the semifinals round of the 2020 Nashville Film Fest in the Tennessee Writers category

MARK NACCARATO‘s drama pilot, “The Exodusters,” is a finalist in the 2020 Nashville Film Fest in the Tennessee Writers category

IRISH JOHNSTON‘s short script, “Seismic Attraction,” has advanced to the semifinals round of the 2020 Nashville Film Fest in the Shorts category

“Kings of Mississippi” by JAY WRIGHT & G ROBERT FRAZIER  advanced to the semifinals round of The Script Lab screenwriting competition, making it one of the top 300 scripts out of almost 13,400 entries.

TOM WOOD’s screenplay, “A Night on the Town,”  co-written by Michael J. Tucker, has advanced to the semifinals of the Southeastern International Film Festival. The script has also been named a finalist in the Peachtree Village International Film Festival. Tom’s script, “Death Takes a Holliday,” is a semifinalist in the WeScreenplay Shorts Contest.

PATRICIA SMITH‘S feature, “I Was Beautiful,” advanced to the quarterfinals in ScreenCraft’s Drama Competition.

Congrats to all our writers on their accomplishments. Did we miss yours? Email us at tennscreen@gmail.com!

Nashville Film Fest screenwriting manager offers do’s and don’ts

By G. Robert Frazier

Cat-Stewart-web-300x200
Cat Stewart

The Tennessee Screenwriting Association was honored to host Cat Stewart, Screenplay Awards Manager for the Nashville Film Festival, at its May 13 Zoom meeting. In her second year heading up the competition, Stewart offered a wide range of advice, do’s and don’ts about writing screenplays for the competition as well as for Hollywood.

Below are some of the highlights from her talk:

Reasons to Enter a Contest

  • Just to be read
  • Just for fun
  • To win prizes
  • To launch a career

Common Mistakes Writers Make

  • Majority of scripts fail on premise or don’t have a commercial concept
  • First act has nothing to do with the rest of the screenplay
  • Protagonist is unclear or there is no journey for the main character
  • Nothing significant happens at the midpoint to raise the stakes or provide a twist
  • Too many pilots fail to hook an audience in the first few pages
  • Flowery language
  • Premises that have no logic
  • No theme

First page keys

  • Make me want to keep reading
  • Genre needs to be clear
  • Clear protagonist
  • Don’t open with a flashback

Practical Advice

  • Re: Flashbacks/voice overs – “If it works, it works. As long as it adds to the story, it’s OK.”
  • Keep in mind cost of the screenplay.
  • “Emotion is the most important thing on the page. Make me laugh, make me cry, scare the crap out of me. Emotion is the number one thing that sells a script.”
  • Re: Grammar/spelling – “If it’s a great script, I don’t freak out about it. We’ll get it fixed.”
  • “Don’t write in 47 genres. No one wants to rep someone who’s writing everything.”
  • Hour and half-hour pilots are where things are selling.
  • Don’t chase the market. “It’ll turn on a dime.”
  • “If you’ve not have a lot of luck or are kind of stagnant with your scripts, volunteer to be a reader. You’ll start finding something you do yourself. I highly recommend being a reader to anyone who wants to educate yourself.”
  • Read, study, break down films. Write! Write! Write!

On Diversity

  • “Last year we had an incredible number of diverse scripts.”
  • “Scripts that have diverse people that are written by diverse people are generally better than scripts written by non-diverse people. It’s not always the case, but if you’re writing about African-Americans and you’re a white man, it doesn’t come off the same way as it does if it’s an African-American writing about African-Americans.”
  • “I think it has to make a difference if the characters are diverse. There should be a reason for them to be in there or don’t write anything about what race they are and let the best actor get that role.”

On Covid-19’s impact

  • “Don’t write a coronavirus script. Hollywood doesn’t want them. If they do, an established writer is going to write it.”
  • Hollywood is looking for lighter stuff in the current climate.
  • Use fewer locations and background actors, but there’s opportunity for cgi
  • More Zoom writers rooms. “That might open up more opportunities for people who aren’t in LA.”

Encouraging Quotes

  • “Screenwriting is hard. Just be aware, it’s a long, long, long game. As long as you stay at it and you have a solid idea for a script, you might get there.”
  • “As far as a logline goes, what you really want to do is get a request to read your script.”
  • “A good film is a simple story well told. Complexity isn’t about the story, it’s about the character and how they deal with it.”
  • “If I’m absorbed in the story, I don’t care what genre I’m in.”

51st Nashville Film Festival

In Memoriam: Wilson Montgomery

Past TSA President James Wilson Montgomery passed away Monday, March 9, after a year-long, brave fight with cancer.

tsa board wilson montgomery
Wilson Montgomery

Wilson began in entertainment as a standup comedian and actor. He graduated from the University of Tennessee with degree in Speech and Theater. He attended The American Academy of Dramatic Arts in Los Angeles and was awarded the honor of being in the third year production ensemble. He has acted Off-Off Broadway in New York and done a number of commercials and a children’s TV series, including Mr. Henry’s Wild and Wacky World.

Parenthood (the lifestyle, not the movie or TV series) lead Wilson to Nashville, where he is survived by his daughters, Hope and Rachel, grandsons, Christian and Vinny, his mother June, father John (Gale), sister Jill Dempsey (Ed), and his brother, Lee, several aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and friends.

He grew up in Knoxville, graduated from Bearden High School in 1981, received a Bachelor of Arts in Theater from University of Tennessee, and completed an acting program at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, Los Angeles, in 1989. Wilson loved the theater, acting & writing. He performed in several local theater productions before moving to Nashville, where he had a successful construction business.

He served as president of the Tennessee Screenwriting Association for two consecutive years, 2018 and 2019.

Memorial contributions can be made to Alive Hospice, 1718 Patterson Street, Nashville TN 37203 or Middle TN Al-Anon, 176 Thompson Lane, Suite G-3, Nashville TN 37211.

Friends can leave memorial messages, send cards, or flowers via this link:

https://www.meaningfulfunerals.net/obituary/james-montgomery?fh_id=10561

 

James V. Hart scares up Script-Com fun

Tennessee Screenwriting Association held its 2019 Script-Com Symposium over two days in June, beginning with a special screening of Bram Stoker’s Dracula at Full Moon Cineplex in Hermitage with screenwriter James V. Hart. Photographer Thom King helped us commemorate the event:

 

Allen Carver and James V. Hart
TSA board member/Script-Com 2019 host Allen Carver poses with screenwriter/guest of honor James V. Hart at Full Moon Cineplex in Hermitage prior to a special screening of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. | photo by Thom King

 

 

 

James V. Hart at Full Moon Cineplex
Screenwriter James V. Hart scares up excitement with fans prior to a screening of Bram Stoker’s Dracula at Full Moon Cineplex in Hermitage. | photo by Thom King

 

Full Moon Cineplex - 3
TSA members Jeff Chase, David Deverell, and Allen Carver join Judith Nugent Hart, wife of screenwriter James V. Hart, in the lobby of Full Moon Cineplex. | photo by Thom King

 

Full Moon Cineplex - 2
A collection of gruesome props greets visitors to Full Moon Cineplex. | photo by Thom King

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TSA to read your scary scripts on Oct. 30

It’s time once again to let your best scares out. TSA members are invited to share their spookiest short scripts at our Oct. 30 Halloween meeting. Scripts can be up to five pages and must be a complete story. Bring them in and hear them read aloud before the group. We dare you to scare us!

Note: Anyone can attend our meetings, but you must be a TSA member in good standing to have your script read. Click here to join TSA.

TSA’s Irish Johnston tells The Hole Truth

The Hole Truth - full posterThe Hole Truth, a short film penned by Tennessee Screenwriting Association member Irish Johnston, will be shown at the 50th anniversary edition of the Nashville Film Festival during the first weekend in October. We asked Irish to share her story about herself, the script, and the process of seeing the film come together.

TSA: Tell us about yourself (where you are from, how you ended up in Nashville, etc.,) and how you became interested in writing, specifically writing for film.

IRISH: I was born in Nashville, but spent a significant part of my childhood in New York City. My father is a writer, so I grew up surrounded by creativity and odd working hours. I initially was introduced to the film industry through acting, which took me out to Los Angeles for a few years. I quickly realized that I had an appetite for all aspects of film making, in front of the camera, behind the camera, and eventually creating content.  I think my acting background has influenced my writing style to pay attention to the characters. I have taken several classes on screenplay writing, including at Watkins and online, and attend the TSA meetings as often as I can.

TSA: What is The Hole Truth about?

 

Irish Johnston
Irish Johnston

IRISH: The Hole Truth is a dark comedic short film about a suicidal woman’s disappointment in the shallowness of human beings. In this exaggerated world, the main character, Suzanna (Sprague Grayden), finds herself in a new job where she gains access to hear strangers’ heartfelt confessions. Her initial excitement quickly fades into despair as the confessions border between shallow and absurd.  As she plans her exit strategy, she discovers a magical hole that leads to an unexpected real connection.

 

TSA: What inspired you to write The Hole Truth?

IRISH: The initial idea came from an article about a terrific, and real, project called Story Corp. Which I am sure is not shallow at all. But I started thinking about what if the audio capsules left in the Story Corp files, for generations to listen to, were actually really disappointing to hear. Add that to what feels to me like a current social climate lacking in real human connection, and voila. Dark comedy.

The Hole Truth 2

TSA: Tell us about the writing process for The Hole Truth. How long did it take from idea to finished script? What were some of the lessons made, mistakes learned along the way?

IRISH: The actual writing of it took about a week. But the ideas were marinating for a while before that. The main character, Suzanna, has a very strong, sort of judgmental, perspective to me, and she was a lot of fun to write. I decided to have a Narrator (Katherine Morgan) help move the story along, which was a more playful voice to write. Getting to watch this screenplay go from the page to the screen, has been super informative. I hope the lessons learned will translate into my future projects.

TSA: Your script won Best Short Screenplay at the Sun Valley Film Festival in Ketchum, Idaho, which in turn led to initial funding for the film. Tell us about that experience.

IRISH: That whole experience was crazy fun. I absolutely adore the Sun Valley Film Festival and how much they appreciate and support writers. From beginning to end they made me feel very special, and that is so hard to come by in this industry.  Winning felt a little surreal, and completely unexpected.  And then, honestly, I had a feeling like I wasn’t winning necessarily, but rather being given this huge daunting task of producing and making a film, which I didn’t feel ready for.  But the SVFF surrounded me with a lot of talented people to help navigate through that. And I made some terrific friends along the way.

 

The Hole Truth
A behind the scenes look at filming of The Hole Truth.

 

TSA: The Hole Truth had a very successful Kickstarter campaign, raising more than $30,000. How did the Kickstarter come about and what do you think made it so effective?

IRISH: My co-producer out of Boise, Karen Toronjo, suggested Kickstarter, so we just jumped in and figured out how to do it.  We were lucky to have a lot of friends and family who were excited and wanted to support the project.

TSA: The film was ultimately shot in Boise, Idaho. Were you on set for the shoot? What was that like?

IRISH: Yes, I was on set for the shoot, no way I would miss that.  I love watching films get made. There is something so special about seeing that process for me.  But at that point I was more in the producer role not the writer role. I had handed over the story to the director, Russell Friedenberg, and felt very confident in the choices he would make. I am a collaborator at heart, and love to see what happens when several people’s creative visions merge together.

TSA: Tell us about the folks who partnered with you (director, producer, actors) who helped make the film a reality.

IRISH: It started with my co-producer Karen. Who introduced me to Russell, the director. He brought in the cinematographer, Gregory Bayne, a true talent. They all knew each other from other projects, so there was already some chemistry there. Russ and I cast it, finding Sprague, and Phil Burke (Russ had worked with him before). Then, I was delighted when I was given the opportunity to cast and use a cinematographer from Nashville, Mark Ramey, to do some cut away “confession” shots we weren’t able to get in Boise.  We also recorded Katherine’s narration here in town.

TSA: The script was also one of three finalists in the 2018 Nashville Film Festival Screenwriting Competition. And now, the film itself is going to be show at NaFF 2019. How does that make you feel?

IRISH: Feels great. Nashville has a talented and supportive film community.  We are lucky to be in a city that values writers and creativity. And now, to have The Hole Truth screening in the festival, makes me very proud.

TSA: How has the TSA helped you and your writing?

IRISH: I love the TSA meetings. I cannot get enough of the core structural questions, “What does your main character want?” “What obstacles does he or she have?” It is mystifying how I can never hear those questions enough, and how often I lose track of them while writing. Writing can feel very solitary, and TSA offers a supportive space where you don’t feel alone.

TSA: What’s next for you?

IRISH: I have several short screenplays submitted to festivals and competitions. One, which was workshopped in the TSA meetings, has won an award, and I am considering producing it.  I am also working on a feature that I have brought pages into TSA for feedback.

For more information about The Hole Truth, visit their Facebook page. 

 

Get ready for The Hole Truth at NaFF

The Hole Truth, a short film written by the TSA’s own Irish Johnston, screens at the Nashville Film Festival at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, in the Tennessee Shorts Block. A second screening is scheduled for 1 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10.

 

Irish Johnston
Irish Johnston

Irish began as an actress in Los Angeles and Nashville. She currently spends most of her time writing screenplays, three of which have been finalists or won awards: Redhanded, Scents, and The Hole Truth, in several film festival competitions.

 

Being a native Nashvillian, with a piano, she has finally surrendered to the siren call of songwriting as well. She loves every aspect of the film industry, from writing and composing, to acting; to her latest challenge, producing.

Screenings will be shown at Regal Hollywood Theaters, 719 Thompson Lane, Nashville, near 100 Oaks Mall. For tickets or more information about the film festival, visit https://nashvillefilmfestival.org

For more information about The Hole Truth, visit https://www.facebook.com/theholetruthfilm/?modal=admin_todo_tour

Mitchell Galin, Samantha Starr to kick off Script-Com

While much of the excitement about the Tennessee Screenwriting Association’s Script-Com Symposium this Saturday naturally revolves A-List writer James V. Hart and his master class, participants will also get to hear from industry professionals Mitchell Galin and Samantha Starr.

Mitchell Galin

Mitchell Galin, who will head up the 11 a.m. hour, is a seasoned, multiple award-winning producer in the film, television and theater mediums. Through his over 30-year career he has developed and/or overseen the production of ten features, over 25 television movies and mini-series, three series, six documentaries and two theater productions.

Galin just completed production on the TV One television pilot Media. Concurrently he is producing his latest documentary on Kauai’s historic Lawai International Center, a non-denominational community project.

Among his current feature projects, Galin is currently developing and packaging the adaptation of Stephen King’s short story “Gingerbread Girl,” which will be directed by Craig Baxley, the family film Blue Lights and the suspense thriller The Disembodied, to be directed by Neville Page. Galin’s other recent productions include the series pilot for the reboot of his iconic series Tales from The Darkside. the Hallmark movies Norman Rockwell’s Shuffleton’s Barbershop, Wedding Planner Mystery and The Shunning and Paper Angels; the award winning documentaries Journey to Everest, Honoring a Father’s Dream: The Sons of Lwala, Survivor, Apostles of Comedy 1 & 2. He is also a producer/writer on the recently released feature documentary, Living Hope.

Included in Galin’s other television producing credits are Sci-Fi’s miniseries Dune; CBS’ miniseries A Season in Purgatory; ABC’s Stephen King’s The Langoliers and Stephen King’s The Stand. These productions earned Galin an Emmy nomination and collectively earned nine Emmy’s. He also produced the award-winning telefilm The Vernon Johns Story, which starred James Earl Jones and amongst its many awards netted him the prestigious Christopher Award, and the CBS series Stephen King’s Golden Years. He was executive in charge of production of the critically acclaimed series Tales from the Darkside and Monsters, the latter of which he co-created. Both of these series were well known for giving a substantial number of directors, writers and actors their first professional job.

Well-known for teaming up Stephen King, Galin was a producer on a number of feature films including the original Pet Sematary and Thinner, which were released by Paramount Pictures, and The Night Flier, a New Line Cinema release.

Galin serves on the board, for the multiple award-winning Kid Pan Alley, a non- profit curriculum-based music enrichment program that teaches grade school children creative writing through an innovative songwriting method. Among his other charitable works, Galin produced and directed a PSA for former Governor Bredesen and Andrea Conte promoting the First Lady’s Walk across Tennessee to raise awareness for Child Advocacy and was one of the producers of Project Restore, a Nashville-centric Tsunami benefit.

While living in New York, Galin delved into the theatrical arena by serving on the boards of the Atlantic Theater Company, founded by David Mamet and William Macy, which produced the multiple Tony Award-winning play Beauty Queen of Lenanne, and the New Dramatists, the country’s most prestigious dramaturgical theater organization.

Galin serves on the board, and was the past president of FilmNashville, the Nashville Screenwriter’s Conference, and was appointed by Gov. Bredesen to the Film Production Advisory Committee, which completed the report that served as the basis for the ‘08 Tennessee State sponsored film incentive program. Galin has served on the boards of the Nashville Film Festival and as a consultant to the Independent Features Project, the largest association of independent filmmakers in the country.

Galin is a member of the Directors Guild of America, Writers Guild of America, Producers Guild and the Academy of Television Arts. His writing and editorial work has been published both in the United States and England. He has served as a guest lecturer at Columbia University, NYU, New School of Social Research, Vanderbilt, Belmont University as well as a panelist at various film festivals including Sundance, IFP, Cannes.

Samantha Starr   

Samantha Starr, who will kick off Script-Com at 10 a.m. Saturday, is a film and TV literary manager at Circle of Confusion Management, previously at Gotham Group and Columbia Pictures in development on films including 21 Jump Street and Moneyball. She transitioned to management at Principato-Young after a stint at One-Two Punch Productions.

Her clients have included TV writers Ester Lou Weithers (Pitch), Andrew Thomas (Henry Danger), Jeane Wong, Becca Rodriguez and Stan Wang; actress Elena Pavli; filmmaker Bennett Lasseter; and playwright James Wesley.

Circle of Confusion is a premiere management and production destination for actors, writers, directors, content creators, publishers and journalists. Circle is active in creating a broad spectrum of television series and feature films, and specializes in the discovery of original, unique and compelling voices, with offices in Los Angeles and New York.

Script-Com Schedule

When: Saturday, June 22

Location: Shamblin Theater / Lipscomb University campus
1 University Park Drive, Nashville 37204

9:30 a.m. — Doors open
10 a.m. — Samantha Starr – Circle of Confusion Management
11 a.m. — Mitchell Galin – Producer/Writer/Director
12 p.m. — Bob Giordano, Writer/Director & Tom Steinmann, Producer
1 p.m. —  Lunch (off site)
2:15 p.m. — James V. Hart Master Class – Writer of CONTACT, THE LAST MIMZY, Spielberg’s HOOK & more.

How writer/director Giordano made a movie and a dream come true

By Tom Wood

Bob Giordano wore a lot of hats during the making of The Odds, an award-winning and critically acclaimed indie film shot on a micro-budget last year in Nashville.

The+Odds_poster_0218_150dpiNot only was Giordano the screenwriter, but he also directed, and had a hand in nearly everv aspect of the thriller/horror produced by Alan McKenna and executive produced by Tom Steinmann (Uproar Pictures) and Kelly Frey (Music City Films).

The story focuses on a woman who gets involved in underground game of pain endurance worth $1 million to the winner, only to learn the rigged game is run by the manipulative and sadistic man out to defeat her. It debuted on June 4 and is available on Amazon Prime Video and at Walmart stores.

Giordano and Steinmann will host a panel session to discuss the movie at the June 22 Script-Com Screenwriting Symposium at Lipscomb University’s Shamblin Theater.

“(The panel discussion will be) a good expression of the process from beginning to end and what you can expect if you’re a truly, truly independent filmmaker,” said Giordano, one of the principals of Uproar Pictures. “One of the things that I think is interesting about it is that, at least the way I went about making this film, you actually end up making the movie several times.”

Giordano then reeled off the ways in which he first conceptualized The Odds, then visualized it, then wrote, rewrote and rewrote some more, then … you get the idea.

Bob Giordano
“We’ll be talking about everything from conceptualizing it for a micro-budget film to all the way through the development, and even past that — to selling it and marketing it…”

 

— Bob Giordano, writer/director

“We’ll be talking about everything from conceptualizing it for a micro-budget film to all the way through the development, and even past that — to selling it and marketing it and sort of a number of things that people talk about in sort of general broad terms,” he said. “But our experience is definitely more focused … and it won’t be the same experience that everybody else has.”

Along the journey, he also pitched the idea and story at the weekly Tennessee Screenwriting Association meetings to get immediate feedback.

“Since I tend to do outlining, that’s kind of the first version of the movie. Then when you do the script and its subsequent rewrites, that’s the second version,” he said.

“And then when you go through the script with your production team and the actors, that’s another version that you do of it. And when it makes the transition from a piece of work on paper to something that you actually have to shoot, then you have to consider where all the actors are going to have to be, where the cameras are going to be, all these things.

“The way I did that most effectively was through storyboard,” he added. “Storyboarding it was another version of the film,” he added. “And then there’s the actual production of it, and then there’s the editing, then the sound design and the music — and these are all versions that are all slightly altered and slightly changed.

“So when people talk about a director’s vision of a story, you’ve got to have a vision that’s a little flexible as a practical sense about how filmmaking works.”

He says that it’s essential for the writer to follow the director’s lead — but even more so when the two are the same person.

“For a writer, part of the job is being open to making all these changes. I was kind of lucky as the director; you don’t have to fight with the writer so much,” he said with a laugh. “But I was pretty lucky — at least as much as a person can be. I tried to be objective once I was mostly done with the writing aspect. I kicked that guy out of the room and tried to keep my director’s hat firmly on.”

Giordano said that while the writer can envision anything, the director has to see what works and doesn’t work, and see the finished product as the audience would view it.

“The thing is that when you’re the writer, you’re trying to express the idea of the story and anything you’re trying to say within that story. Your job and your intention usually tends to be trying to get that out as clearly and as artistically as possible,” he said.

“But once you are a director, you have to be far more concerned with how the audience is actually going to receive this information. Because it’s not a work on paper, it’s moving pictures.

“So the audience gets all this information and sometimes the information is portrayed in a way that the writer was not aware, either for good or for bad, how it would come across to an audience when it’s actually playing on the screen among actors.

And it’s the director’s job to really make sure that the story is going to be received by the audience, and really the first audience for the film.”

Giordano hopes to carry those lessons he’s learned into his next project, Gates of Flesh, which he says i much more of a horror movie than The Odds, with “elements of supernatural and end of the world stuff.” Then it will be a sequel to The Odds followed by a faith-based film.

Screenwriter James V. Hart will headline Script-Com, which is hosted by the Tennessee Screenwriting Association. Events kick off Friday with Hart at a screening and discussion of his Bram Stoker’s Dracula script at Full Moon Cineplex in Hermitage. Then on Saturday, Hart will headline Script-Com, discussing both his movies and the HartChart app and Toolkit he developed to help writers map stories and characters.

Besides 1992’s Dracula, Hart’s credits include Hook (1991), Bram Stoker’s Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1994), Muppet Treasure Island (1996), Contact (1997), Jack and the Beanstalk: The Real Story (2001), Tuck Everlasting (2002), Lara Croft: Tomb Raider—The Cradle of Life (2003), Sahara (2005), August Rush (2007), Epic (2013), the 2014 TV series Crossbones, and 2019’s The Hot Zone min-series on National Geographic.

Script-Com: What to Know

Script-Com admission is $50 and includes the Friday night screening and Saturday’s symposium, plus a one-year membership in the TSA. Current members pay just $40. To register, go to https://tennscreen.com. To attend a buffet/mix and mingle with Hart prior to Friday’s movie, cost is $15 at the door.

The June 22 symposium will open with a 10 a.m., presentation by manager Samantha Starr, who has recently joined Circle of Confusion Management. Following Starr will be producer Mitchell Galin, who has been involved in a number of Stephen King adaptations including The Stand, Pet Semetary, Thinner, The Langoliers, and other projects including Dune.

“ScriptCom is going to be good whether you are a beginning screenwriter or you are an A-list screenwriter,” said Jeff Chase vice-president of the Tennessee Screenwriting Association. “There’s going to be something for everybody.”

 

 

Tennessee Screenwriters Directory

TSA members are welcome to provide a bio about themselves for our Tennessee Screenwriters Directory. You can include writing credits, genres you write in, loglines for completed scripts, social media and website links. The idea is to help get the word out about who we are and what we do. Think of this as your imdb bio. (You can even use your imdb bio, if you’ve got one!). To add your name and info to the directory, just fill out the following information below and email your information to tennscreen@gmail.com. Jpeg photos of yourself are encouraged. 

The writer’s directory is open to paid members of the TSA. Membership is just $25 a year. To join, go here.

 

Tennessee Screenwriters Directory

Name:

Bio (please provide 3-4 sentences about yourself, such as job, educational background, screenwriting credits or other accomplishments, etc.):

Genres:

Skills (examples: screenwriting, scriptreading, directing, editing, sound editing, etc.):

Facebook:

Twitter:

Website: